Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings Recipe (Манты)

Central Asian Manti Steamed Dumplings made with ground beef and pumpkin. Popular across Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Delicious with sour cream - Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты) Manti Steamed Dumplings (Манты) pumpkin pieces

Manti Steamed Dumplings (Манты) pasta ringsCentral Asian Manti Steamed Dumplings made with ground beef and pumpkin. Popular across Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Delicious with sour cream - Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты)

This Manti Steamed Dumplings Recipe (Манты) is one of the many recipes that reminds me of my childhood. It’s really fun creating a website of my favourite recipes that we eat. I just love all this food, and Manti are no exception. Manti are very common in Central Asia/Eurasia from China, Russia, the Stany countries (Kazakstan, Uzbekistan, Pakistan…) and all the way to Turkey.

I believe they originated with the Uyghur people, and spread over many cultures via the Silk Road across Central Asia. My parents were born in the Uyghur region of Northern China, as my grandparents had fled the USSR to this remote area of China. There are many variatons of manti, with many different names. In Mongolia, they are called buuz, in Siberia, they have a version called pozi (позы), Chinese have mantau and jiaozi, Koreans have mandu, Tibetans have momo, Japanese have gyoza, even the Saudis have mantu. The Turkish manti are quite small and can be baked instead of steamed.

The Uyghur people were situated along the Silk Road, and that’s how it’s thought to have spread across the region and beyond. Manti are usually made with lamb or beef, but we grew up eating a Kazakh version which incorporates pumpkin into the mixture. Manti are steamed in a multi level steamer called a mantavarka. They usually sell the steamers in Asian shops. I’m lucky that I came across several steamer disks that fit over my large stock pot, which works great.

I love this version of manti, as it’s very juicy with the pumpkin, and has a great flavour. You want to use a sweet pumpkin for manti, the sweeter the better. My mum went digging through the pile of pumpkins in the store to find the sweetest pumpkin. I have no idea how she knew, but the pumpkin we used was perfect. It’s best to finely chop the pumpkin into tiny pieces, but that takes so long. We just used a food processor, but don’t turn them into mush, leave some chunky small pieces.

The pumpkin to meat ratio should be about 50:50 at most, if you want to play with the recipe portions. Mum also made a potato version which mixed potatoes, peeled, diced in small tiny cubes with meat, onions, and black pepper. It looked like a 60:40 ratio meat to potato, but Manti are most commonly made with plain meat and onion.  Manti are very juicy when you bite into them, and are usually eaten by hand, which can be messy. Usually I just pierce them with a fork, and dip into my sauces.

There are many ways to sauce up manti. The common Russian way is to eat with sour cream. I like to eat them with Lazadzhan also known as Laza Hot Sauce, an Uyghur hot sauce, or with chilli and black vinegar. When we were kids, we always ate them with ketchup and soy sauce, which is how my kids eat them too. The whole family can help make the manti, everyone gathered around the table, pinching the pillows of dough. They come in many different shapes, from star shapes, fancy roses shape, oval, square, round, and all look different depending on how you pinch them shut.

It’s a big task to make manti, so we make big batches and freeze into Ziploc bags, ready to pull out for a quick and easy meal. The kids keep asking, can we eat manti today? But I’m still slowly rationing until we can make more. Bon Appetit! Приятного аппетита!

Central Asian Manti Steamed Dumplings made with ground beef and pumpkin. Popular across Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Delicious with sour cream - Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты) Central Asian Manti Steamed Dumplings made with ground beef and pumpkin. Popular across Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Delicious with sour cream - Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты)

Ingredients
For the dough
5 cups flour
1 tablespoon oil
1 teaspoon salt
1 egg
1 1/2 cups of water

For the filling
3-4 large onions
750grams pumpkin pieces
750g ground beef and lamb mixed
1 tablespoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 cup oil
3/4 cup water

Instructions
1. In a chopper or food processor, pulse the pumpkin and onion separately, not too finely, still in small chunks. Alternatively, cut into small cubed pieces.  Mix together with the meat, salt, pepper, oil and water, using your hands, until combined. Set aside.

Manti Steamed Dumplings (Манты) pumpkin prepManti Steamed Dumplings (Манты) pumpkin processing

Manti Steamed Dumplings (Манты) meat mixtureManti Steamed Dumplings (Манты) meat mix
2. Mix dough ingredients together and knead on the counter for about 5 minutes, until dough it’s a smooth ball. Let the dough rest for half and hour and give it a good knead again for a few minutes. Cover with a bowl and let it rest for at least 1 more hour.
3. Cut dough into pieces. Using a rolling pin, roll out the dough into a thin layer (about 1/8″). It’s much easier to use a pasta roller, or I use a KitchenAid Mixmaster pasta roller attachment. Take the cut piece of dough, roughly roll with a rolling pin until it’s able to be rolled through the pasta maker. First time, I rolled it on a thicker setting #1, then follow through with a thinner setting #2, which gets you to the desired thickness. Sprinkle flour on the pasta pieces to prevent them from sticking to the table.

Manti Steamed Dumplings (Манты) rolling pinManti Steamed Dumplings (Манты) pasta rolling
4. Use a large can or a glass for cutting the shape of the dough circles. We used a Cadbury’s Hot Chocolate Can which has a 4″/10cm diameter. Cut circles with the can, combine the off cuts into a ball, knead and roll out again. This process always easier with 2 people. One rolling, one cutting, then making manti together.

Manti Steamed Dumplings (Манты)Manti Steamed Dumplings (Манты)
5a. There are many ways to shape manti, here are my 2 favourites. Put about a generous tablespoon of meat mixture into the circle piece of dough, careful for the meat not to touch the sides of the dough or it won’t stick shut. Pinch and close the opposite sides of the dough together (corner to corner) until you have a little pinched dough pocket. Place on a tray and put in the freezer until frozen solid. Put in ziploc bags until ready to steam (or you can eat them fresh as in the next step).

Manti Steamed Dumplings (Манты) preparationManti Steamed Dumplings (Манты) pinching dough

Manti Steamed Dumplings (Манты)Manti Steamed Dumplings (Манты)
5b. Put about a generous tablespoon of meat mixture into the circle piece of dough, careful not to touch the sides of the dough or it won’t stick shut. Pinch the middle of the dough together in the centre. Pinch the adjacent sides together, meeting in the centre, pinching all edges of the dough closed. It’s going to kind of look like a star shaped pillow. Place on a greased steamer disks, about 1/2″ apart from each other. Some use butter, but I generously sprayed oil.

Manti Steamed Dumplings (Манты) processManti Steamed Dumplings (Манты) sealing dumplings

Central Asian Manti Steamed Dumplings made with ground beef and pumpkin. Popular across Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Delicious with sour cream - Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты) Manti Steamed Dumplings (Манты)
6. Bring water in your mantavarka to a boil. Place the steamer disks over the water and steam manti for about 30-40 minutes, until the meat is cooked.
7. Serve with Lazadzhan, or sour cream, or black vinegar and chilli, or with Ketchup and soy sauce.

5.0 from 3 reviews
Manti - Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Central Asian Manti Steamed Dumplings made with ground beef and pumpkin. Popular across Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Delicious with sour cream - Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты)
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: Central Asian
Ingredients
  • For the dough
  • 5 cups flour
  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1½ cups of water
  • .
  • For the filling
  • 3-4 large onions
  • 750grams pumpkin pieces
  • 750g ground beef and lamb mixed
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • ½ cup oil
  • ¾ cup water
Instructions
  1. In a chopper or food processor, pulse the pumpkin and onion separately, not too finely, still in small chunks. Alternatively, cut into small cubed pieces. Mix together with the meat, salt, pepper, oil and water, using your hands, until combined. Set aside.
  2. Mix dough ingredients together and knead on the counter for about 5 minutes, until dough it's a smooth ball. Let the dough rest for half and hour and give it a good knead again for a few minutes. Cover with a bowl and let it rest for at least 1 more hour.
  3. Cut dough into pieces. Using a rolling pin, roll out the dough into a thin layer (about ⅛"). It's much easier to use a pasta roller, or I use a KitchenAid Mixmaster pasta roller attachment. Take the cut piece of dough, roughly roll with a rolling pin until it's able to be rolled through the pasta maker. First time, I rolled it on a thicker setting #1, then follow through with a thinner setting #2, which gets you to the desired thickness. Sprinkle flour on the pasta pieces to prevent them from sticking to the table.
  4. Use a large can or a glass for cutting the shape of the dough circles. We used a Cadbury's Hot Chocolate Can which has a 4"/10cm diameter. Cut circles with the can, combine the off cuts into a ball, knead and roll out again. This process always easier with 2 people. One rolling, one cutting, then making manti together.
  5. There are many ways to shape manti, here are my 2 favourites. Put about a generous tablespoon of meat mixture into the circle piece of dough, careful for the meat not to touch the sides of the dough or it won't stick shut. Pinch and close the opposite sides of the dough together (corner to corner) until you have a little pinched dough pocket. Place on a tray and put in the freezer until frozen solid. Put in ziploc bags until ready to steam (or you can eat them fresh as in the next step).
  6. Put about a generous tablespoon of meat mixture into the circle piece of dough, careful not to touch the sides of the dough or it won't stick shut. Pinch the middle of the dough together in the centre. Pinch the adjacent sides together, meeting in the centre, pinching all edges of the dough closed. It's going to kind of look like a star shaped pillow. Place on a greased steamer disks, about ½" apart from each other. Some use butter, but I generously sprayed oil.
  7. Bring water in your mantavarka to a boil. Place the steamer disks over the water and steam manti for about 30-40 minutes, until the meat is cooked.
  8. Serve with Lazadzhan, or sour cream, or black vinegar and chilli, or with Ketchup and soy sauce.

©PetersFoodAdventures.com

Central Asian Manti Steamed Dumplings made with ground beef and pumpkin. Popular across Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Delicious with sour cream - Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты)

Central Asian Manti Steamed Dumplings made with ground beef and pumpkin. Popular across Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Delicious with sour cream - Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты)

Central Asian Manti Steamed Dumplings made with ground beef and pumpkin. Popular across Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Delicious with sour cream - Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты)

 

 

 

 

 

Central Asian Manti Steamed Dumplings made with ground beef and pumpkin. Popular across Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Delicious with sour cream - Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты) Central Asian Manti Steamed Dumplings made with ground beef and pumpkin. Popular across Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Delicious with sour cream - Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты) Central Asian Manti Steamed Dumplings made with ground beef and pumpkin. Popular across Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Delicious with sour cream - Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты) Central Asian Manti Steamed Dumplings made with ground beef and pumpkin. Popular across Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Delicious with sour cream - Manti Russian Steamed Dumplings (Манты)

10 comments

  1. Thank you. The step by step instructions are easy to follow. I’ve always been scared to make this meal, but will make it now

    • You’re welcome. Thanks for checking the recipe out. Give the recipe a try, manti are very forgiving with sizes and shapes! Enjoy!

  2. My parents have the same journey that your family We live in London. Canada. My mother prepared the same recipes. I had reccipes. But have lost them. Thankyou for posting these

    • Thanks Nadia for checking out my site. I’ve enjoyed documenting recipes and sharing about our common journeys and our past. I think it’s important to know your past, and I think food plays a huge role in culture! I’m glad you enjoyed them! Feel free to follow my site on Facebook too!

  3. They look a bit like Polish pierogi (that are probably not Polish but Russian in origin), just a bit more charming 🙂 Anyway, the idea is more or less the same. It’s a dish quite hard to make, so I am impressed with your skills. Adding pumpkin is interesting!

    • They do look like Pierogi, which I’m going to make soon! But they are a steamed version. I believe the Turkish boil a version of this. So much overlap in culture! 😊 Thanks for your complements, it’s been fun to make!

    • Thanks for the great feedback, I appreciate it! Glad you enjoyed reading it, and thank you for checking it out! 👍

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