Easy Vegemite Stroganoff

Australian Vegemite with Russian Stroganoff served with rice, Fusion at it's best - Easy Vegemite StroganoffVegemite Stroganoff

Vegemite StroganoffVegemite Stroganoff

Easy Vegemite Stroganoff is made from Australian Vegemite with Russian Stroganoff served with rice, Fusion at it’s best. How can I explain Vegemite, if you have never heard of it? Vegemite is a breakfast staple in Australia, one which Aussie kids grow up on.

According to Wikipedia, Vegemite is a dark brown Australian food paste made from leftover brewers’ yeast extract with various vegetable and spice additives. That was a mouthful.  It’s also on the the richest sources of B vitamins, specifically thiamine. The flavour is described as salty, slightly bitter, malty and rich in umami – similar to beef boullion.

It’s most commonly spread very, very thinly on toast, or on a cheese and Vegemite sandwich. The flavour is powerful and needs a very thinly spread. The flavour is similar to Marmite, Promite, and Cenovis. It’s definitely an acquired taste, which you will either love or hate. It’s funny to see Americans on YouTube, tasting Vegemite for the very first time. You’re eating it all wrong! It’s not Nutella or peanut butter and tastes horrible if you had a teaspoon of it, or spread it thickly on toast. Just promise me that if it’s your first time having Vegemite, you’ll go easy on it!

I also love Worcestershire Sauce in my food to add bit of extra flavour, but it must be Lea & Perrins, which is the original and used in Europe for hundreds of years. The USA recipe is slightly different from the British recipe, as it is more sweeter, but should work the same.

My recipe has some strange sauces, which brings me to Vegemite Stroganoff (Бефстроганов). Well that’s what I call it. When we first got married, this was a dish that my wife made up and it quickly became one of my favourites. I love her Classic Chicken Stroganoff recipe, but this one is one of my favourite recipes. It’s super quick to make and served over rice. Usually, by the time the rice is finished cooking, your Vegemite Stroganoff sauce is ready too.

The Vegemite adds a certain depth to the sauce. The added sugar is necessary to balance out the saltiness in the sauce. You will need to taste and adjust as required. I love this recipe, especially the sauce drenched over the rice, an Australian twist on a Russian classic. Bon Appetit! Приятного аппетита!

Vegemite Stroganoff
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Vegemite Stroganoff is made from Australian Vegemite with Russian Stroganoff served with rice, Fusion at it's best - Easy Vegemite Stroganoff
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: Australian
Ingredients
  • 500g beef, sliced into thin strips
  • 300g button mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon Vegemite
  • ¼ cup Worcestershire sauce
  • 150ml whipping cream
  • ½ cup sourcream
  • 3 teaspoons sugar
  • black pepper
Instructions
  1. Fry beef strips until lightlty browned. Add sliced mushrooms and Worcestershire sauce and cook for about 3-4 minutes.
  2. Add Vegemite and dissolve into the juices until mixed throughout.
  3. Add sour cream and whipping cream. until mixed.
  4. Add black pepper and sugar to taste. Need to balance out the sugar with the saltiness of the vegemite. Mix, taste, adjust if necessary.
  5. Allow to simmer for a few minutes to reduce liquid. Serve over white rice.

©PetersFoodAdventures.com

Australian Vegemite with Russian Stroganoff served with rice, Fusion at it's best - Easy Vegemite StroganoffAustralian Vegemite with Russian Stroganoff served with rice, Fusion at it's best - Easy Vegemite Stroganoff

Australian Vegemite with Russian Stroganoff served with rice, Fusion at it's best - Easy Vegemite Stroganoff

9 comments

  1. I like the taste of marmite, so probably I would like vegemite, too. At the moment, I am obsessed with miso, which has the taste similar to marmite (I hope no Asian read this; If does, please, forgive me this blasphemy). So, will add it to a sauce, when I make any soon. Unless, I spot vegemite in a store. Must be horribly expensive in Ireland, though.

  2. I was fascinated with your recipe. I have had Marmite. I know the saltiness. It’s like olives. You need to eat at least 6 olives to acquire the taste. (Proven to be true). The first try is a bit disarming. But, the health benefits are so strong, you will start to use it often. It is under rated in Canada.

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