Lagman Recipe – Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)

A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable beef stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable beef stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)

A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable beef stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable beef stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)

This Lagman recipe is a tradtional hand pulled, stretched noodle stir fry of the Uyghur people of the Xinjiang region of northwest China, situated en route the Silk Road. This is the region where my parents were born and lived, as my grandparents (from both sides) fled from the Soviet Union to China for safety from religious persecution.

China didn’t turn communist until 1949, so they had to flee again to the west. We grew up eating so many of the flavours of the food of Central Asia and the Uyghur people, as that was the food my parents and grandparents ate. The other Uyghur recipe I have made is called Funchoza with Beef, but I made an Australian variation Funchoza with Chicken and Prawns.

The Soviet Union was so big, and covered a large part of Central Asia, where Lagman is common, from Kyrgyzstan, Kazakstan to Uzbekistan. It’s easy to think of the Soviet Union was only European, but the melting pot of cultures and food across the Eurasian empire was amazing. Enough about the geography lesson!

Lagman Recipe
It’s so much work to make any lagman recipe – honestly this has been the hardest and most intimidating blog to write. I can stir fry anything with no problems, but the making of the noodles is daunting. I’ve been lucky enough to observe how my mum makes it, taking careful notes and photos, my son even helped pull and twist the lagman.

Growing up, we called this leghmen, not lagman or laghman, but I think the incorrect pronunciation was lost in translation, or maybe it was a pronunciation of a local dialect or tribe. Lagman is also known as lamian, similar to lo mein, and is thought to be of Chinese origin.

One of the main differences from Chinese hand pulled noodles compared to the Uyghur noodles, is the use of oil instead of flour to keep the noodles from sticking to each other. It sounds fattening, but it all boils out in the water. It just works.

Lagman noodles are boiled and then served with lamb, beef or chicken, but never pork, as the Uyghur are a muslim people and pork is not halal. This meat stir fry is usually made with red peppers, green beans, tomato paste, and whatever stir fry type of vegetables are on hand. Asparagus is in season, and went beautifully with this meal. I also like to add some garlic chives (джусай) but didn’t have any in the garden. 

Chinese Black Vinegar is the dominant flavour in this meal, not soy sauce. This creates a whole new dimension and category of an Asian stir fry, that is a bit hard to find outside of Central Asia, but if you look hard enough, you might be lucky to find an Uyghur restaurant. Definitely worth the effort!

The person pulling the noodles makes it look so easy, they twist and pull the dough into noodles, and the really good cook knows how to keep the noodles even and have a consistent thickness. It’s very hard to master this technique, but having irregular noodles shows that it’s handmade, not machine made.

The other unique process in making lagman is while the dough is resting between the stretching and pulling, it’s traditionally rolled in an oiled spiral. I asked mum to do a small plate to show, otherwise, she just laid short pieces side by side on a plate or counter. She said she prefered to use shorter pieces as they are easier to handle than the super long pieces.

The last unique part of this process, is during the pulling of the noodles, you hit them on the table with the rolled up noodles in your hands, while you gently stretch them. This lagman recipe has been the hardest post to write, to try to do justice to explaining the process of a how to make something that looked so easy growing up, but completely different when you want to make it for your own family.

I took a lot of pictures, mostly for my own memory, but hopefully it can show the process a bit more clearly. Mum has no written lagman recipe, it’s all made from memory. She said the dough must be soft, and she added a water and extra flour during the process to get the right soft feeling of the dough. She also didn’t use a measuring cup, but a coffee mug. So it is bigger than a 250ml cup. Just think of your regular coffee mug, and you’ll be fine.

Lagman is always served with Chinese black vinegar on the table, and I love to add Sriracha sauce, or any chili garlic sauce for a spicy kick. Thanks for coming on this journey with me, my kids can’t get enough of this food. I’m grateful to keep and share a part of our unique history, and to pass this Lagman recipe down to the next generation. Bon Appetit! Приятного аппетита!

Lagman Recipe - Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Time: 6hrs
  • Difficulty: hard
  • Print

A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable beef stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)Lagman Stir Fry

Ingredients
Lagman Recipe – Hand Pulled Noodles
5 mugs flour
2 eggs
1 teaspoon of salt added into 1 1/2 mugs of water
vegetable oil
water for boiling

Lagman Recipe – Stir fry
500 grams green beans chopped in small pieces
2 red peppers (capsicum)
Asparagus bunch chopped in pieces
2 large onions or 3 medium onions sliced in thin strips
8 cloves garlic minced
500 grams beef sliced thin for stir fry
3 teaspoons tomato paste
Oil for frying
Chinese black vinegar
1 cup of boiling water

Instructions for Lagman Noodles
1. Mix together the flour, egg, salty water, making a ball of dough. Knead the dough for about 10 minutes. To prevent the dough from sticking to the surface of the counter, mum put a tiny bit of oil on the counter and continued to knead the dough, instead of lightly dusting the counter with flour.
2. Cut the dough into wide strips. Using your hands, roll into 8″ strips that are about the thickness of your finger. Length doesn’t really matter at this point, longer lengths are common, but shorter lengths are easier to handle. Lightly brush in oil, even as you are rolling and forming them into the strips. Keep them covered in oil to ensure they don’t stick together. Place on an oiled plate or dish. If on a plate, coil into a circle, and continue each piece, until you have one large continuous coil. Alternatively, place them side by side in a dish and brush with oil. Cover with cling wrap so they don’t dry out. Allow them to rest for a minimum of 4 hours. It’s best to allow the dough to rest overnight. By allowing they to rest, they will stretch and pull into shape without tearing. Don’t skip this step.

Lagman Recipe - Uyghur Noodle preparationLagman Recipe - Uyghur Noodle resting pasta

Here’s the fun part.
3. Bring a large stock pot of water to a boil. Meanwhile start preparing the dough.
4. This is the first part of this dough preparation. Take one strip of dough and using your hands, stretch and pull it, holding the dough with your left hand, and pulling a few inches with your right hand, continuing until the piece of dough is stretched. It will start to look like a thick oily shoe lace. Keep each stretched shoe lace dough in an individual piles, not touching each other. While you are pulling, also twist at the same time. The technique is hard to master, so just pull, twist and pray for the best!

Lagman Recipe - Uyghur Noodle twisting pullingLagman Recipe - Uyghur Noodles

Repeat this process twice, further stretching and twisting each individual dough lace. Cover them with cling wrap during this process, as they will start to dry out.
5. The final time of stretching, you need to stretch the rope, while coiling it up like a rope, between your hands, maybe 2 feet apart. Another way to describe it would be to hold it with one hand, and loop it around the other, and continue until your noodle is looped. Then you hit the table gently but firmly with your noodle loop, aiming to hit the middle of the loop on the table. While you are hitting, you are also widening the gap between your hands. The end result is longer stretched noodles. Hang the noodles on the edge of the table until you are ready to cook them. It will take a few tries to get this to looks like noodles, and the shape will be irregular, and pieces might rip, but thats ok. It will all cook together in the same pot!

Lagman Recipe - Uyghur Hand Pulled Noodle Stir FryLagman Recipe - Uyghur Noodle Stretching pulling

Lagman Recipe - Uyghur Stretched NoodlesLagman Recipe - Uyghur Noodles

6. The pot of water should be truly boiling by now. Drop the noodles in batches into the boiling water. Bring the water back to a boil and cook for about 2 minutes. Using a fork or chop sticks, break apart the noodles so they don’t clump together while they cook. The oil on the noodles will help, and the oil washes off the noodles into the water, just like making pasta. After 2 minutes of boiling noodles, pull one out and taste. It should be al dente and firm.

Lagman Recipe - Uyghur Noodle Stir FryLagman Recipe - Uyghur Fresh Noodles

7. Prepare a bowl of cold water. When the noodles are cooked, remove from the pot using a mesh/wire noodle strainer, and place into the cold water bowl. This will stop the cooking process. Remove the noodles out of the cold water almost immediately, and serve with lagman stir fry.

Instructions for Lagman Stir Fry
1. The goal is to fry all the ingredients separately and add them together in the end. The garlic is to be divided equally in all the ingredients, added towards the end of the frying time. Garlic is a finishing flavour, add it too soon, and the flavour will loose it’s impact. Mum used 2 frying pans to fry things at the same time, this really sped up the process.
2. Add oil to a hot frying pan and fry the beef until it’s cooked. When the beef is cooked, add the tomato paste and fry for a few more minutes until its fully coated the beef and the tomato paste has cooked a bit. Add 1 tablespoon of Chinese black vinegar. Finish by adding some garlic in the last few minutes of cooking. Turn off the heat from this frying pan and set aside.
3. Add oil and fry the onions until golden brown. Finish by adding some garlic in the last few minutes of cooking. Add the onions to the frying pan of beef.
4. Add oil and fry the aspargus, flash fry it very quickly, for only 2 minutes, add about 1 teaspoon of garlic, mix for 1 minute, and add the asparagus to the frying pan of beef.

Lagman Recipe - Uyghur Noodle Stir Frying meatLagman Recipe - Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry Frying meat

5. Add oil and fry green beans. Fry them for about 7 minutes, add garlic, mix and fry for a minute and add the green beans to the frying pan of beef.
6. Turn the frying pan with the meat and vegetable mix back on high heat. Add the red peppers and fry them quickly together. Finish off the remaining garlic to the mixture. Cook for another 2-3 minutes.
7. Add a cup of boiling hot water. Bring mixture to a boil and cook for a few minutes. The colour of the water should have some red in it, from the tomato paste. If it doesn’t then you didn’t add enough tomato paste and the flavour won’t have depth.

A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable beef stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable beef stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)

8. Serve as soon as the Lagman noodles are ready. Remember to have the Chinese black vinegar available on the table. Enjoy!
©PetersFoodAdventures.com


5.0 from 1 reviews
Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)
 
Cook time
Total time
 
A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: Uyghur
Ingredients
  • 5 mugs flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon of salt added into 1½ mugs of water
  • vegetable oil
  • water for boiling
  • 500 grams green beans chopped in small pieces
  • 2 red peppers (capsicum)
  • Asparagus bunch chopped in pieces
  • 2 large onions or 3 medium onions sliced in thin strips
  • 8 cloves garlic minced
  • 500 grams beef sliced thin for stir fry
  • 3 teaspoons tomato paste
  • Oil for frying
  • Chinese black vinegar
  • 1 cup of boiling water
Instructions
  1. Mix together the flour, egg, salty water, making a ball of dough. Knead the dough for about 10 minutes. To prevent the dough from sticking to the surface of the counter, mum put a tiny bit of oil on the counter and continued to knead the dough, instead of lightly dusting the counter with flour.
  2. Cut the dough into wide strips. Using your hands, roll into 8" strips that are about the thickness of your finger. Length doesn't really matter at this point, longer lengths are common, but shorter lengths are easier to handle. Lightly brush in oil, even as you are rolling and forming them into the strips. Keep them covered in oil to ensure they don't stick together. Place on an oiled plate or dish. If on a plate, coil into a circle, and continue each piece, until you have one large continuous coil. Alternatively, place them side by side in a dish and brush with oil. Cover with cling wrap so they don't dry out. Allow them to rest for a minimum of 4 hours. It's best to allow the dough to rest overnight. By allowing they to rest, they will stretch and pull into shape without tearing. Don't skip this step.
  3. Bring a large stock pot of water to a boil. Meanwhile start preparing the dough.
  4. This is the first part of this dough preparation. Take one strip of dough and using your hands, stretch and pull it, holding the dough with your left hand, and pulling a few inches with your right hand, continuing until the piece of dough is stretched. It will start to look like a thick oily shoe lace. Keep each stretched shoe lace dough in an individual piles, not touching each other. While you are pulling, also twist at the same time. The technique is hard to master, so just pull, twist and pray for the best! Repeat this process twice, further stretching and twisting each individual dough lace. Cover them with cling wrap during this process, as they will start to dry out.
  5. The final time of stretching, you need to stretch the rope, while coiling it up like a rope, between your hands, maybe 2 feet apart. Another way to describe it would be to hold it with one hand, and loop it around the other, and continue until your noodle is looped. Then you hit the table gently but firmly with your noodle loop, aiming to hit the middle of the loop on the table. While you are hitting, you are also widening the gap between your hands. The end result is longer stretched noodles. Hang the noodles on the edge of the table until you are ready to cook them. It will take a few tries to get this to looks like noodles, and the shape will be irregular, and pieces might rip, but thats ok. It will all cook together in the same pot!
  6. The pot of water should be truly boiling by now. Drop the noodles in batches into the boiling water. Bring the water back to a boil and cook for about 2 minutes. Using a fork or chop sticks, break apart the noodles so they don't clump together while they cook. The oil on the noodles will help, and the oil washes off the noodles into the water, just like making pasta. After 2 minutes of boiling noodles, pull one out and taste. It should be al dente and firm.
  7. Prepare a bowl of cold water. When the noodles are cooked, remove from the pot using a mesh/wire noodle strainer, and place into the cold water bowl. This will stop the cooking process. Remove the noodles out of the cold water almost immediately, and serve with lagman stir fry.
  8. Instructions for Lagman Stir Fry
  9. The goal is to fry all the ingredients separately and add them together in the end. The garlic is to be divided equally in all the ingredients, added towards the end of the frying time. Garlic is a finishing flavour, add it too soon, and the flavour will loose it's impact. Mum used 2 frying pans to fry things at the same time, this really sped up the process.
  10. Add oil to a hot frying pan and fry the beef until it's cooked. When the beef is cooked, add the tomato paste and fry for a few more minutes until its fully coated the beef and the tomato paste has cooked a bit. Add 1 tablespoon of Chinese black vinegar. Finish by adding some garlic in the last few minutes of cooking. Turn off the heat from this frying pan and set aside.
  11. Add oil and fry the onions until golden brown. Finish by adding some garlic in the last few minutes of cooking. Add the onions to the frying pan of beef.
  12. Add oil and fry the aspargus, flash fry it very quickly, for only 2 minutes, add about 1 teaspoon of garlic, mix for 1 minute, and add the asparagus to the frying pan of beef.
  13. Add oil and fry green beans. Fry them for about 7 minutes, add garlic, mix and fry for a minute and add the green beans to the frying pan of beef.
  14. Turn the frying pan with the meat and vegetable mix back on high heat. Add the red peppers and fry them quickly together. Finish off the remaining garlic to the mixture. Cook for another 2-3 minutes.
  15. Add a cup of boiling hot water. Bring mixture to a boil and cook for a few minutes. The colour of the water should have some red in it, from the tomato paste. If it doesn't then you didn't add enough tomato paste and the flavour won't have depth.
  16. Serve as soon as the Lagman noodles are ready. Remember to have the Chinese black vinegar available on the table. Enjoy!

©PetersFoodAdventures.com

A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable beef stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable beef stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)

A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable beef stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)A wonderful Central Asian classic, the original pasta, hand pulled and delicious with Chinese black vinegar vegetable stirfry - Lagman Recipe Uyghur Noodle Stir Fry (Лагман)

32 comments

  1. OMG, that’s the most amazing stir fry recipe I’ve ever seen… I would never venture to make the proper Laman, though, given my total lack of ‘manual skills’.

  2. Hi Peter what is your last name mine is Chirkoff and we r from exactly the same background just wondering if our families know each other

  3. This is the best post! I loved reading about the history, from the etymology of lagmein to leghmen to lo mein, and the geography of Russia/Asia, and the memories of your mom making this dish! All around awesome post! Oh- and the recipe looks so tasty too. 😋

  4. This looks amazing! It fascinates me to read about the process for the noodles and seeing the pictures! I love family recipes that are passed down by feel and how it looks, so you really have to learn alongside your mom. Thanks for sharing!

  5. Hi Peter, I am so glad I found this Leghmen recipe and instructions. I remember helping my mom make when I was young. My mom and grandparents fled communists Russia into China and than again fled China. I was born in China. Maybe our family knows yours. My mom knew some that went Australia. My mom’s name is Ducia (Evdokia) Krapivkin. Anyway, thank you for posting this, brings back so many memories of her cooking and baking.

    • Hi Julie, Thanks so much for taking the time to read my post. It’s amazing how so many of us share a common history, and how far around the world we have spread. I’ve contacted you via private message on Facebook. Thanks again for following me on Facebook. Have a great day 🙂

  6. I am impressed, you are quite the chef in the kitchen. Isn’t it amazing the meals our mothers cooked when we were young, the time and effort they put into them, even though they may have looked effortless at times. It is only when we are older and attempt them, do we realise…but seriously, well done. You have a great meal here for sure, I can only imagine how good it tastes.
    I enjoyed the history and geography lesson. It really is interesting to know all the facts. Hope you and your family have a great weekend 🙂

  7. Wow Peter amazing that you were able to document this from mom’s technique and flavor. This is one of my favourites too! Great job!

  8. Wow, I had no idea it was so involved. We had this once in a restaurant, and it was so incredibly delicious! Thanks for sharing the recipe!

    • Thanks Stacey. It’s so delicious, and I suppose all good things take time! I agree, the flavours are unique and so delicious. Thanks for checking me out! 🙂

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